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News and Politics | San Francisco Bay Guardian

Tale of two Internets

Officials work to close the digital divide, an inequitable reality even in high-tech SF

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For the digitally connected, sometimes it's hard to remember life without the Internet.

Bills can be paid with a click, calendar appointment reminders pop in our e-mail inboxes, and YouTube lessons teach us mundane tasks like faucet fixing (was I the only one who didn't know how to do that?). And those are some routine, everyday ways we weave the online world into our offline routines. Some, especially in San Francisco, spin a wider digital web.Read more »

Racing for solutions

Candidates running in District 10 debate the myriad problems facing southeast San Francisco

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rebecca@sfbg.com

Although there are five seats on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors up for reelection this fall, incumbents face few contenders with the requisite cash and political juice needed to mount a serious challenge. The one race that has stirred interest among local politicos is the bid to represent District 10, the rapidly changing southeastern corner of San Francisco that spans the Bayview, Hunters Point, Visitacion Valley, Dogpatch, and Potrero Hill neighborhoods.Read more »

Nuclear shakeup

Leaked earthquake safety document raises fresh concerns about Diablo Canyon, which activists want shut down

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It was more than six years ago that Jeanne Hardebeck, a seismologist at the US Geological Survey's Menlo Park Earthquake Science Center, started to zero in on a pattern. "I was looking at small earthquakes," she explained. "I noticed them lining up."

 

She and other earthquake scientists also detected an anomaly in the alignment of the earth's magnetic field off the California coastline, near San Luis Obispo. It all added up to the discovery of an offshore fault line.Read more »

Tom's legacy

As Ammiano returns from Sacramento, can he help revive San Francisco's progressive spirit?

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steve@sfbg.com

At a moment when San Francisco politics has slid toward the slippery center — when one-time progressives align with business elites, the political rhetoric seems hollow, and the vaunted value of "civility" in City Hall increasingly looks more like a deceptive power grab by the Mayor's Office — it feels so refreshing to talk with Tom Ammiano.Read more »

Gearing up for war

The SFPD and police departments across the country get free military equipment, but does it make us safer or provoke violence?

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joe@sfbg.com

A tear gas canister explodes as citizens flee from the gun-toting warriors, safely guarded behind their armored vehicles. Dressed in patterned camo and body armor, they form a skirmish line as they fire projectiles into the crowd. Flash bang explosions echo down the city's streets.Read more »

Waiting for answers

Community calls for justice and transparency in police shooting of Nieto after new eyewitness contradicts SFPD version

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rebecca@sfbg.com

As word spread to San Francisco that police in Ferguson, Mo., were taking reporters into custody and firing tear gas at demonstrators outraged by the death of Mike Brown, a small group of writers and organizers with ties to the Mission District was gearing up to hold street demonstrations of its own.

On Aug. 21 and 22, they staged vigils and a march and rally in memory of a different shooting victim: Alejandro ("Alex") Nieto, who died suddenly in Bernal Heights Park on March 21 after being struck by a volley of police bullets.Read more »

Teachers prepared to strike

United Educators of San Francisco authorize preliminary strike vote as concerns about cost of living rise

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rebecca@sfbg.com

The first day of school was Aug. 18 in the San Francisco Unified School District, but a group of teachers started the day with a press conference announcing the possibility that they could soon go on strike.

The teachers union, United Educators of San Francisco, announced the results of a strike authorization vote held the previous Thursday. The vote, which was the first of two required to authorize a strike, resulted with an overwhelming "yes" with 99.3 percent of teachers saying they would take that step if necessary.Read more »

More time, same crime

Decades after crack cocaine "epidemic," bill aims for parity between crack and powder cocaine sentencing

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joe@sfbg.com

Roll up a dollar bill, snort a line of coke, sit back and smile: If your cocaine use leads to a conviction, your drug of choice will be spared from the harsher penalties associated with inhaling the substance through a glass pipe. When it comes to busts for cocaine possession and dealing, those caught with a rock instead of the powdered stuff are kept behind bars longer. But that could soon change.Read more »

Burning Man jumps the shark

How a high-minded countercultural experiment ended up on everyone's bucket list

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steve@sfbg.com

The question of when Burning Man jumped the shark is a matter of perspective, or perhaps it's a philosophical question, but these are waters worth wading into as burners pack up this week for their annual pilgrimage to the playa.

The meme that Burning Man has jumped the shark — that is, that it's gotten ridiculous or strayed from its original ethos — circulated more strongly this year than most after conservative firebrand Grover Norquist last month tweeted that he was "off to 'Burning Man' this year. Scratch one off the bucket list."Read more »

Block the Boat

Protesters prevent Israeli ship from unloading during two days of picketing outside the Port of Oakland

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rebecca@sfbg.com

An Israeli ship that was scheduled to dock at the Port of Oakland was prevented from unloading its cargo on Aug. 17 when activists picketed at the dock entrances in protest of recent violence in Gaza.

The Zim Piraeus vessel, operated by Zim Integrated Shipping Services, Ltd., had come into dock earlier that day after the postponement of its scheduled arrival on Aug. 16, when a large crowd went to the port to participate in a march and rally dubbed Block the Boat for Gaza.Read more »