Twitter

Twitter, tax breaks and the New York Times

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Just about everyone who watches news media is calling it the Story of the Week, and it's probably going to be one of the top stories of the year, my (informal) nominee for a Pulitzer: Louise Story at the New York Times exposes how corporate America shakes down state and local governments -- who often get little in return. Read more »

SF approves Twitter-sized apartments for tech workers

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San Francisco is giving Twitter tax rebates to help grow a business that reduces our communications to 140 characters or less, and now the city's Board of Supervisors has approved the creation of extra-small apartments for the Twitter drones who toil long hours in the company's new mid-Market headquarters, along with their brethren at other tech companies, the target audience for these tiny living spaces.Read more »

The fallout from Twitter continues

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San Francisco has never been able to do big-scale economic redevelopment without displacement of existing residents and businesses, and the "revitalization" of mid-Market is turning out to be another case in point. Rents are going up all over the neighborhood (as well as other parts of Market Street) as the second tech boom roars into San Francisco. And now it's having an impact on a community-based theater-development plan -- and potentially on even the more established theaters in the area.Read more »

Mid-Market boom great for speculators

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The boom in mid-Market office space continues, with Dolby now joining Twitter as a big tech outfit moving into the corridor. There's a lot of debate about whether this is entirely an amazing thing for the world, or for San Francisco, or even for mid-Market (esp. Read more »

The right business tax

Is it even worth launching a ballot measure campaign for $13 million?

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EDITORIAL In some ways, the battle over San Francisco's business tax represents a shift in the local power structure: For most of the past 30 years, the finance, insurance and real-estate industries — the traditional downtown corporate leaders — called the shots at City Hall. Any honest list of the most powerful people in town started with bankers and real-estate developers, and most of the time, they got their way.Read more »

Editorial: The business tax debacle

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Labor and much of the progressive community worked with downtown and the Mayor's Office last year to craft a pension-reform bill that took away benefits from city employees. The unions came to the table, recognized the city's financial problems and bought into a compromise, even though it took money out of their pockets.

And now big business, with the support of Mayor Ed Lee, wants to reform the local business tax in a way that doesn't bring the city a dime of new revenue (and hurts small business in the process).

In other words, it's fine to seek compromise when it's about cutting workers pay and city costs. When it's about asking big business (and a lot of big businesses, particularly tech businesses, in this town are doing exceptionally well right now) to chip in just a little more, to do the right thing, address the revenue side of the ledger and pay a fair share, the answer is No. Read more »

Is Twitter ruining American politics?

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No, I'm not talking about tax breaks.

Our pals at Calbuzz, who are never dull, argue that the 140-word-ization of journalism is, well, screwing everything up.

Three reasons:Read more »

The bubble is back

City policies are encouraging a new tech boom — but have we learned any lessons from the last one?

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steve@sfbg.com

San Francisco's future is in the process of being written, once again using lines of computer code and blips on the screens of electronic gadgets, the same as during the last dot-com boom. Its proponents insist it will be different this time — that Boom 2.0 won't displace the working class, that the bubble won't burst — but critics have their doubts.Read more »