Taxis

Uber neighborhood pricing surge charges Marina most

|
(43)

Uber charges the Marina and Pacific Heights districts up to three times as much for a ride as the rest of the city in its new “neighborhood surge” program, according to leaked emails and screen captures. 

The surges happen during rush hour, weekend night bar crawls, and also around concerts and other events that would draw riders to Uber’s app. Read more »

Faux cabs: A tourism industry perspective

|
(21)

I got a fascinating letter from a person who's worked in the tourism business in San Francisco for many years, and he's very worried about the impact of the faux cabs on the city's biggest industry. Here's his note:Read more »

Dealing with the faux cabs

|
(95)

Lots of comments on my article outlining the problems with the fake cabs that are riding around town without medallions or proper screening. The main complaint the trolls have appears to be their dislike of cab drivers and the difficulty of getting a cab in some places and at certain times. I've never had a bad experience with an SF cab driver in 30 years of living here and taking cabs, but I'm sure there are others who have; no industry is perfect.Read more »

The cost of fake cabs

Start-ups could put the city $300 million in the hole

|
(90)

tredmond@sfbg.com

Hansu Kim has been involved in the San Francisco taxi industry for more than a decade. He helped design the current system of buying and selling cab permits, or medallions. In 2011, he led a group that bought DeSoto Cab, and now he runs what many say is the best-managed livery company in the city. Taxis are his career — and he's about ready to pull the plug.Read more »

Are the new ride-shares unsafe?

|
(14)

Interesting letter to sfist, which typically loves the new rideshare companies like Lyft and Sidecar. The writer, apparently a cab driver, makes clear why these unlicensed cabs are a problem:Read more »

More unregulated cabs on the street

|
(17)

So the state regulators have decided that it's just fine for companies that pretend not to be taxi operators to operate taxis in San Francisco. That means Lyft and Uber can keep picking up passengers, charging them a "recommended donation" and avoiding the regulations that San Francisco wisely put in place to pro Read more »

A cab driver's lament

Regulatory framework is to blame for a crappy cab system -- and companies that dodge safety guidelines aren't helping

|
(8)

OPINION I'm a San Francisco taxi driver. The reality on the streets is terrible.

Cab drivers are being squeezed from all sides. The Municipal Transportation Agency is part of the problem, because for the past year or so it has been energetically focused on enhancing the city's revenues by selling taxi medallions (for $200,000) and putting hundreds of new cabs in service, at the expense of drivers.Read more »

Cabs v. Lyft et. al. isn't just about tech

|
(65)

Of course the Chron portrays it as "The latest battle pitting disruptive high-tech innovators against old-school industries and regulators," because that makes for good copy. It also puts the taxicab industry and the people who oversee it in the position of being dinosaurs fighting against an inevitable new world.Read more »

The unregulated cabs

Community taxi apps seem like a good idea -- but they're going to put people out of work 

|
(43)

EDITORIAL Yeah, the shared economy. Yeah, high tech. Yeah, there's an app for that. Yeah, the San Francisco cab industry is screwed up and you can never get a cab when you need one.

But that's not an excuse for the city to stand by and allow a whole cottage industry of unregulated, unlicensed cabs hit the streets, using a business model that everyone knows is fake and undermining decades of painstakingly crafted rules that govern this critical part of the city's transportation infrastructure.Read more »

Cab drivers sue over medallion sales

|
(9)

Five cab drivers have filed a lawsuit against the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, arguing that the agency’s sale of taxi permits should legally be considered a tax and that the agency’s so-called Taxi Medallion Sales Pilot Program is invalid without the approval of two-thirds of the voters.

The pilot program was put in place in part to help close the city’s $483 million dollar deficit.Read more »